construction

Lighting and Outdoor Space Were Key to Transforming This New Construction Home

When Shanty Wijaya of Allprace Properties decided to take on her latest project—a modern farmhouse in L.A.’s historic Jefferson Park neighborhood—she wanted to create a calming atmosphere with an intrinsic outdoor-indoor living situation inspired by the California-cool neighborhood it was built in.

“This neighborhood is known for its Craftsman-style homes, filled with character and history,” says Shanty. “The layout was very closed off and the finishes were uninspiring. The landscaping was completely bare, unappealing, and empty. Our goal was to transform this standard new build into a character-filled Craftsman-style home that blended nicely into the charming neighborhood.” Working with a theme of modern farmhouse and Craftsman style, she completely restored the newly built 2,000-square-foot home, which includes four bedrooms and three bathrooms on a 5,076-square-foot lot.

<div class="caption"> <strong>BEFORE:</strong> Shanty says that landscaping was one of the most difficult tasks of the transformation. “When we designed and landscaped the project, it was winter and most of the plants were still dormant. It was difficult to find tall, mature plants that had a full appearance, which is the look we were going for. We wanted to make sure that the homeowner could enjoy an outdoor, private <a href="https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/creating-your-own-edible-garden?mbid=synd_yahoo_rss" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:oasis" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">oasis</a>, and we were able to get the desired look for the landscaping, which I am very proud of.” </div>
BEFORE: Shanty says that landscaping was one of the most difficult tasks of the transformation. “When we designed and landscaped the project, it was
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Tempers flare as Miami-Dade construction sites take COVID-19 precautions but stay open

While the construction industry in Miami-Dade scrambles to raise safety standards to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus, public and private sentiment that the job sites should shut down continues to grow.

Residents who live inside buildings where cosmetic repair work is being done agonize over the non-stop noise. Other people living near construction sites are stuck in their homes, where they can’t escape the ear-piercing beeps of heavy machinery.

“We are so upset,” said Carole Brendel, 67, who lives with her husband, Jurgen, 75, on the 29th floor at 2020 North Bayshore Drive in Edgewater, next to the site where developer Mill Creek Residential is building the 28-story luxury condo tower Modera Biscayne Bay.

“We’re not sleeping,” Brendel said. “We are stressed. The construction started six months ago, but back then we weren’t trapped inside our home 24/7. Now the beep-beep of the cement trucks wakes us

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